Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Kununurra - afternoon - Thursday 24th June


This was billed as a 'cruise', which it wasn't. It took 3 hours plus and covered nigh on 70kms. It was incredibly beautiful, and yet repetitive. It was too long, but we sat longer in the bus. Effectively, there was only one point of departure, and we needed to finish somewhere close to our accommodation for the night. So ... I would not want to eliminate it. But ...


We had two whopping big engine-things on the back and we went hell-fer-leather. But not just us. There were four boats our size on the river. Sorry, I did not mention we were on the Ord River, starting from the wall of the Argyle Dam and finishing on the outskirts of Kununurra.

The wash was phenomenal, smashing into the river's edge in both direction. Not only us, but the other boats. AND - there are three sessions each day. That is a lot of wash.


Grant is one of the head-honchos of JJJ Tours. He was very good. Very knowledgeable. Very open to questions. We talked about viability. We talked about evaporation. We talked about sustainable cropping. He gave sooo much information. But, it was useful to me. I must admit that I asked most of the questions. But that happens everywhere. He knew the river backwards - well you would belting down it three times each day during the Dry Season.


Immensely beautiful, you must admit. And some of you will have seen some of the reflections on my other blog, Sydney Eye. I took more photographs in this 3 hours than on many other entire days. *blush*

I have taken the bird and crocodile images out for a separate post. There will also be a separate post on the most sublime sunset that I have ever sailed into. Beats the one on Darwin harbour hands down. But here, just admire the sedges, the reeds, lilies and the light .. ooo the light.


Here is just a hint of the animal life along the river. Miniscule samplings. Look at the green ants ... and that wrapped up thing is their nest. We saw lots of this, and once again dilly diddums moi had to show her ignorance and ask what the heck they were. Just terrific. And see that wasp nest ... I am confused because I think that is a Paper Wasp too ... but I told you on Geike Gorge that something that looks quite different was also a Paper Wasp. This is all from memory ... soo ...

And how about that Rock Wallaby? There were two of them sort of on adjacent rock faces. How on earth did they get there? And what did they eat? Mountain goats have nothing on these little blighters!

I had my hat wedged firmly on my skull, my winter woollies wrapped around me, and with my balance issues was flung around more than I enjoyed. But ... I loved lots about this trip. Just not the environmental damage.

6 comments:

ChrisJ said...

Such beautiful photographs -- especially of the rock. The scenery is so different from what I'm used to. I would have loved the boat trip -- but not thundering along. You see so much more moving slowly and quietly

diane said...

Great shots, especially hard to get the wallabies. It was a fun trip and full on information overload. The sunset was awesome.

Joan Elizabeth said...

I always feel that way on boats .. always far to long for me but the scenery just might have made me happy that day ... the photos and light are wonderful.

Gypsy Lala said...

Super beautiful what words can't tell.

Joan Elizabeth said...

Was discussing the "wash" problem with my hubbie today and he said that if the banks are rocky the wash is not such a problem. He said the issue was more likely to be oil residue from the boat engines, rubbish and people's poo going into the water. I looked it up and that is indeed the concern they have for this waterway.

We leave our grubby footprints everywhere it seems but I am nonetheless not in favour of locking up the wilderness.

Julie said...

NO I am not in favour of locking it up either. But we are a destructive lot even though we often don't mean to be.